Everybody Sees the Ants Review

I recently finished Everybody Sees the Ants by A.S. King and enjoyed it. Beware spoilers ahead…

It begins with Lucky Linderman, an ordinary high school student, except that he was being bullied. Badly bullied. Growing up, he rarely felt like he fit in, but did okay, skating under the radar, until he developed a questionnaire about suicide for a class project. Then it wasn’t only teachers who took notice, but the bullies as well. Lucky became the target of Nader McMillan. The abuse finally went too far at the town pool during the summer when McMillian crushes Lucky’s face into the asphalt.

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McMillan was not Lucky’s only problem. His mom was a squid. She swam obsessively to deal with her problems, but once out of the pool pretended everything was fine. His dad was a turtle, retreating from problems, rather than dealing with them. One of those problems had appeared in Lucky’s dreams. Lucky’s father was severely impacted by the fact that his dad, Lucky’s grandfather, never made it back from the Vietnam War. Every night throughout the novel, Lucky’s grandfather showed up in his dreams as he slept.

Lucky attempted to save his grandfather each night, and these escape attempts helped him cope. In his dangerous, wartime dreamscape, Lucky was strong and heroic. I constantly questioned, was it only a dream because Lucky woke up with more than memories. Items such as cigarettes and chewing gum were at his bedside when he awoke.

The protagonist had another secret as well. Ants. The insects helped him cope with life and provided advice. They were his cheering squad, his conscious, and the inner voice that allowed him to successfully navigate the harsh realities around him.

After Lucky’s last run-in with Nader at the pool, his mom rushed him away to her brother’s house and the rest of his summer was spent in Tempe, Arizona. There, Lucky bonded with his Uncle Dave, until he learned his uncle was not the stellar man he pretended to be, cheating on Aunt Jodi who turned to pills to cope. He also met an older, wiser teen, who he crushed over. She faced problems of her own, but her situation finally allowed Lucky put his life into perspective.

What I loved about the book was the reality and complexity of the characters, family dynamics, and the plot, which is why I spent so much time outlining it above. Often, I parents are made out to be cliché in books about teens, but all the characters were realistic and believable in Everybody Sees the Ants. I especially liked how Lucky’s mom was portrayed. As a reader (and mom), I could see how much she cared for her son even if she didn’t know what to do about the bullying. While all the characters displayed shortcomings, which only made them more realistic, the relationships came across as truthful and loving. At the end, there was hope for a better future.

It was interesting to view the world through Lucky’s eyes, giving the reader a truthful teen perspective. He disliked his overbearing, pill-popping aunt until he realizes she was coping with a cheating husband that everyone in town seems to know about. Once Lucky realizes his aunt’s life is as complicated as his own, he shows empathy for her situation and develops a connection with her.

The pacing was exceptional, and I enjoyed how the author took Lucky away from the bullying for a while so he could examine life and find himself. Ants was an intense story, but it could have been much darker. Removing Lucky from the bullying gave the reader much needed levity because even though the reader is removed from the day to day bullying, they learn about how truly heinous the situation had become for Lucky. When he shares the “real story” to his new friends it was emotional. I guessed the twist early on, but still felt the impact of it, when the truth was told.

The use of magical realism remained excellent throughout the story. It could be hard for a reader to suspend disbelief if the magical realism doesn’t ring true enough, but I had no problem believing the magical realism of Lucky’s dreams and loved how at the end, Lucky brought his grandfather’s wedding ring to his dad. Magical moment. Tears. Throughout the novel, the author also used the dreams as a way to help Lucky escape from reality. In the dreams, he was both physically fit and mentally strong. By the end of the story, Lucky realizes he brought those same qualities to his day to day life.

My critique of the story centered around the fact that it read a little dated. Even though it was written in 2014, there were no cell phones. This left me confused. In addition, the ants, a figment of Lucky’s imagination, also left me a little chagrined. While I was able to embrace the dreams as magical realism, the ants were a little harder to accept. At points, I wondered what their role was in the novel.  These were minor faults in a stellar read.

Five ants!!!! Over all, a great read and one I would highly recommend to students.

Black Friday is For Books

Black Friday is for book shopping too!

CON BoxsetTwelve Months of Awkward Moments and Carnival of Nightmare available on B&N and Amazon @ https://amzn.to/2BZef2Q

 

Giveaway for Amazon GC and e-books starts Monday.

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Check out the book tour:

November 26th
Within The Pages Of A Book
Abooktropolis
It’s a Book Life
Cindy’s Love of Books

November 27th
Birdie’s Bibliotheca
Moohnshine’s Corner 
The Phantom Paragrapher 
Amy’s MM Romance Reviews 
Booky thoughts and me

November 28th
A British Bookworm’s Blog
1-800 Books
Heartbeats Between Words
Hauntedbybooks
Book Briefs

November 29th
The Crafty Engineer’s Bookshelf
Set a Spell Book Blog
Rockin’ Book Reviews
Books We Love
The Spacejamber Reviews

November 30th
Melanie the Homebody
BOOK JUNKIE REVIEWS
Book Reviews by Steph
Coffee Books and Cakes
bookish bibliophile

December 1st
Desired Reads Bookblog
Bookstanista
Fiona Reads and FoodSpots
Dauntless Books and Penguins

Enter the giveaway at:

https://www.rafflecopter.com/rafl/display/d04251232751/

The Many Ways to See Me!

Check out one of my favorite places in CT on Better Connecticut. They did a story on The Storyteller’s Cottage, and I show up after 4 1/2 minutes. The Storyteller’s Cottage on Better Connecticut

TMOAM-Cover.jpgI”ll be talking one-one-one to writers at The Storyteller’s Cottage on Dec. 2. Get all the information at https://www.storytellerscottage.com/writing-workshops.  Have a question about the writing process, ask away! You can also find all my books for sale at The Storyteller’s Cottage.

Is it time to start shopping. Did someone you know enjoy Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine? How about Turtles All the Way Down? Get them a copy of Twelve Months of Awkward Moments. New 5-star review on Goodreads and Amazon states:

“If you are looking for an emotional read, then this book is for you. It really digs deep and touches on a subject that many people struggle with everyday. Mental Illness. Dani has several people in her family that suffer from mental illness and Dani herself struggles with anxiety and social awkwardness.

“She is always second guessing her decisions and conversations. She has to be perfect at her studies and she is extremely hard on herself. In this book you get to see Dani grow and learn to cope with her disabilities and fall in love. It is a tough road for her, but she is a strong girl.

“This book was a steady read. Not really a thriller, but does have some suspense and a bit of danger in it. This book will reach down into your soul. You can’t help but feel for the Dani and love her. There were times when I felt she was blind to some things going on in her life, but she figures it out.

“Overall this is a very good read. One that feels real, with real life problems. An emotional roller coaster, with wonderful characters. If you love books that deal with depression and different levels of mental illness, then this book may be up your ally. It is well written and enjoyable.

*ARC provided by Lisa Acerbo & Xpresso Book Tours”

Get your copy at Amazon

Why Are Zombies Popular?

FrankzombieFrom World War Z to The Walking Dead (graphic novel and TV series), zombies make their presence known in books and on the small and big screens. While watching zombie movies and reading books in the genre, I became a little overly infatuated with the undead. The family would say I went through a “thing,” attending comic cons and watching, rewatching, and revisiting certain movies featuring animated corpses.

These movies are some of my favorites.  They are gross, grossly funny, and engrossing, and in doing so both scare and entertain me.  More importantly, they teach lessons. My love of zombies started with watching movies such as Night of the Living Dead (1968) and Dawn of the Dead (1978).  Soon after, I moved on to films such as 28 Days Later (2007), Shaun of the Dead (2004), Resident Evil (2002) and Zombieland (2009). My feelings on Warm Bodies (2013), still undecided. Recently, I loved Girl with all the Gifts (2017) and Train to Busan (2016) is one of my all time favorites .

Why do we love zombies so?

  1. Zombie movies and books provide commentary on society. We all have days when we feel like the walking dead, overwhelmed with work and stressed with life.  Zombies help remind us that we need to put negative feelings behind us, break away from complacency, and live for the moment.
  2. The zombie genre often combines humor and horror allowing viewers to laugh at their fears and learn lessons. While each story is unique, there is often a deeper meaning behind all the hoards of brainless undead roaming the streets and eating the living. We just need to figure it out. The process to do so is often as fun as the results.
  3. The fears played out on screen and in books are universal. While movie stars battle and kill hordes of zombies, most individuals have little control over global warming, economic downturn, or school shootings.
  4. Similarly, zombies provide some catharsis over the problems people hear about or have to face in daily life. Reading or watching as others overcome their fears and survive unbelievable situations provides escapism and hope.  If protagonists can create a happy ending in fiction and film, maybe we have a chance to conquer whatever problems come our way.
  5. Zombies reflect the best and worst of humanity. The zombie genre movies and books shed some light on what it means to be human. Do we fight for ourselves or for others? Do we turn to each other for comfort or destroy one another to survive?  While no clear answer emerges, zombie movies and books offer different scenarios about humanity at its best and worst.

Now it is up to you. Start reading and watching today.Graves